Sillagos


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Sillagos and smelt-whitings are members of the Sillaginidae family. They are widespread throughout the Indian ocean and the Western Pacific ocean. The sillagos have an elongated body with long and conical snout. Their opercle have a small sharp spine and they have 2 separate dorsal fins.

Sillagos are inshore species that feed mainly on benthic or epibenthic organisms. They are found in shallow sandy bays and frequently enter estuaries, penetrating into fresh water for brief periods. Most species are schooling.

There are 6 genera and about 34 species of Sillaginidae worldwide. Malaysia has one genus and about 8 species.


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Scientific Name: Sillago aeolus  Jordan & Evermann, 1902
English Name: Oriental Sillago, Trumpeter Sillago, Blotchy Sillago
Mandarin Name | 鱼类中文名: 星沙鮻 (Xīng shā suō), 沙钻 (Shā zuàn)
Local Malay Name: Ikan Bulus-bulus, Bebulus, Kedondong, Seloncong, Puntung Damar Ubi
Thai Name | ชื่อสามัญภาษาไทย: ปลาเห็ดโคนข้างลาย (Plā h̄ĕdokhn k̄ĥāng lāy), ปลาเห็ดโคนจุด (Plā h̄ĕdokhn cud)
Local Hokkien: Sua Jui, Sua Jiam
Local Teochew: Sua Jui
Local Cantonese: Sar Joi
Main Identification Features: Head long, more than 33% of standard length. Dark blotch at base of pectoral fin. Body colour is silvery with scattered dark brown elongate blotches on the sides, reaching caudal flexure. Upper and lower dark blotches separated.
Size: Maximum standard length 30 cm.
Habitat and Ecology: Coastal waters and estuaries, to 60 m depth. Feeds on benthic or epibenthic organisms.










Scientific Name: Sillago ingenuua  McKay, 1985
English Name: Bay Sillago, Bay Whiting
Mandarin Name | 鱼类中文名: 湾沙鮻 (Wān shā suō), 沙钻 (Shā zuàn)
Local Malay Name: Ikan Bulus-bulus, Bebulus, Seloncong, Puntung Damar Teluk
Thai Name | ชื่อสามัญภาษาไทย: ปลาเห็ดโคนทราย (Plā h̄ĕdokhn thrāy)
Local Hokkien: Sua Jui, Sua Jiam
Local Teochew: Sua Jui
Local Cantonese: Sar Joi
Main Identification Features: Dorsal soft ray 17 and anal soft ray 17. No wide distinct silvery lateral band. Peritoneum black-brown. No black spot on pectoral fin base.
Size: Maximum standard length 20 cm.
Habitat and Ecology: Inshore coastal waters, 20 to 50 m depth. Feeds on benthic or epibenthic organisms.






Scientific Name: Sillago lutea  McKay, 1985
English Name: Mud Sillago, Mud Whiting
Mandarin Name | 鱼类中文名: 泥沙鮻 (Ní shā suō), 沙钻 (Shā zuàn)
Local Malay Name: Ikan Bulus-bulus, Bebulus, Seloncong, Puntung Damar
Thai Name | ชื่อสามัญภาษาไทย: ปลาเห็ดโคน (Plā h̄ĕdokhn), ปลาทราย (Plā thrāy)
Local Hokkien: Sua Jui, Sua Jiam
Local Teochew: Sua Jui
Local Cantonese: Sar Joi
Main Identification Features: Body is light sandy brown above, pale brown to whitish below, with an ill defined silvery mid-lateral band. Margins of scales may be slightly darker giving a vague meshwork pattern to the body above the lateral line. Fins hyaline, the first dorsal-fin membrane tipped with a fine dusting of black. Dark outer lobes on the caudal fin. No dark spot at the base of the pectoral fin.
Size: Maximum standard length 16 cm; commonly to 15 cm.
Habitat and Ecology: Coastal waters and estuaries muddy or very silty substrates, to 60 m depth. Feeds on benthic or epibenthic organisms.












Scientific Name: Sillago sihama  (Forsskål, 1775)
English Name: Silver Sillago, Silver Whiting
Mandarin Name | 鱼类中文名: 多鳞沙鮻 (Duō lín shā suō), 沙钻 (Shā zuàn)
Local Malay Name: Ikan Bulus-bulus, Bebulus, Seloncong, Puntung Damar Perak
Thai Name | ชื่อสามัญภาษาไทย: ปลาช่อนทรายแก้ว (Plā ch̀xn thrāy kæ̂w)
Local Hokkien: Sua Jui, Sua Jiam
Local Teochew: Sua Jui
Local Cantonese: Sar Joi
Main Identification Features: Dorsal soft ray 20-23 and anal soft ray 18-23. Body light tan, silvery yellow-brown, sandy-brown, or honey coloured. A midlateral, silvery, longitudinal band. No black spot on pectoral fin base. Caudal fin dusky terminally. Anal fin frequently with a whitish margin.
Size: Maximum standard length 30 cm; commonly to 20 cm.
Habitat and Ecology: Coastal waters and estuaries, to 60 m depth, usually shallow depth. Feeds mainly on polychaete worms, small prawns, shrimps and amphipods.







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