Carangids (Queenfishes)


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Jacks, scads, trevallies, queenfishes, runners, amberjacks, pilotfishes, pampanos and etc. are the members of the Carangidae family. The family members are made up of many highly variable body shape fish species. The carangids are distinguished from all other similar families in having the first 2 anal fin spines detached from rest of fin. These spines are sometimes partially or completely embedded in large adults of several genera, especially Seriola, Alectis, and Caranx and can only be found by dissection. Most species have spiny scutes along lateral line.

The carangids are marine fishes found in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific oceans. Their habitats and behaviour are highly variable. Most of them are schooling species. Most species are fast swimming predators that hunt at or near the surface, mostly in oceanic waters, and often far offshore. Some root in sand for invertebrates and fishes.

There are altogether 30 genera and 147 species in the Carangidae family worldwide. There are 19 genera and about 61 species found in Malaysia.

The family has four subfamilies, Caranginae consist of a mixtures of 20 genera and 104 species like the threadfishes, trevallies, scads, horse mackerels, moonfishes, black pomfret, and etc. Naucratinae consist of 5 genera and 13 species also with many mixtures. Trachinotinae consist of 2 genera and 21 species of mostly pompanos. Scomberoidinae consist of 3 genera and 10 species of queenfishes (leatherjackets).

This page shows the species from Scomberoidinae subfamily called commonly as queenfishes or leatherjackets.


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Scientific Name: Scomberoides commersonnianus  Lacepède, 1801
English Name: Talang Queenfish, Leatherskin
Mandarin Name | 鱼类中文名: 舢舨跳 (Shānbǎn tiào), 三保公 (Sānbǎo gōng)
Local Malay Name: Ikan Talang Bongkok, Talang Lima Jari
Thai Name | ชื่อสามัญภาษาไทย: ปลาสละ (Plā s̄la)
Local Hokkien: Sam Pan Thiao, Sam Poh Gong, Tua Peh Gong
Main Identification Features: 5 to 8 round blotches on sides. Upper jaw reaching well beyond eye.
Size: Maximum total length 120 cm, commonly 75 cm.
Habitat and Ecology: Coastal waters close to reef and offshore islands, to 50 m depth. Occasionally swim in small schools. Primarily a daytime surface to midwater feeder. Feeds mainly on fishes, opportunistically on crustaceans, molluscs and other pelagic prey. Juveniles feed on the scales and epidermal tissues of other fishes using specialized rasping teeth.
Remarks: The spines of the first dorsal and anal fins are venomous and capable of inflicting painful stings.








Scientific Name: Scomberoides tala  (Cuvier, 1832)
English Name: Barred Queenfish
Mandarin Name | 鱼类中文名: 舢舨跳 (Shānbǎn tiào), 三保公 (Sānbǎo gōng)
Local Malay Name: Ikan Talang-Talang, Talang Padi
Thai Name | ชื่อสามัญภาษาไทย: ปลาเฉลียบป้อม (Plā c̄helīyb p̂xm)
Local Hokkien: Sam Pan Thiao, Sam Poh Gong, Tua Peh Gong
Main Identification Features: Oval blotches elongate vertically on side of body. Upper jaw reaching only a little beyond vertical from posterior margin of eye.
Size: Maximum total length 75 cm.
Habitat and Ecology: Coastal waters, to 100 m depth. Usually seen swimming solitary in surface waters. Feeds on fishes and other pelagic prey.
Remarks: The spines of the first dorsal and anal fins are venomous and capable of inflicting painful stings.








Scientific Name: Scomberoides tol  (Cuvier, 1832)
English Name: Needlescaled Queenfish
Mandarin Name | 鱼类中文名: 舢舨跳 (Shānbǎn tiào), 三保公 (Sānbǎo gōng)
Local Malay Name: Ikan Talang-Talang, Seliat, Sampantiau, Talang Lampai
Thai Name | ชื่อสามัญภาษาไทย: ปลาสีเสียด (Plā s̄īs̄eīyd), ปลาขานกยาง (Plā k̄hānkyāng)
Local Hokkien: Sam Pan Thiao, Sam Poh Gong, Tua Peh Gong
Main Identification Features: Upper jaw not reaching to below hind margin of eye, scales needle-like and tip of 2nd dorsal fin sharply pigmented.
Size: Maximum total length 60 cm, commonly 40 cm.
Habitat and Ecology: Coastal waters, to 50 m depth. Adults are found in small schools near the surface in coastal waters. Adults feed on fishes, crustaceans and other pelagic prey. Juveniles feed on the scales and epidermal tissues of other fishes using specialized rasping teeth.
Remarks: The spines of the first dorsal and anal fins are venomous and capable of inflicting painful stings.







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